Brown Eyed Soul Vol. 1 by Cherri V – Classic yet Contemporary

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There are not many who have quite the rep that Cherri V has. A notable mainstay in Black British music, she has spent time honing her craft, recording alongside the likes of Jessie J, Dawn Richard, Wiley and Lethal Bizzle in the process. Having also been one half of the renowned underground R&B duo Dora Martin, she recently settled down to work on her debut solo full length.

A true artist, the London performer’s sense of soul is evident and her vocal ability is not only undeniable but unrivalled by many however it has taken her a fair amount of time to put together an individual body of work that we can enjoy. And now, after years of hard work in the industry, we finally have Brown Eyed Soul Vol. 1.

The name is a spin on the classic phrase ‘Blued Eyed Soul’ – the idea of the classic genre performed by white artists, from your Justin Timberlake to your Joss Stone. While there’s no shade on her end – she made this apparently clear in an interview – she emphasises through the title and throughout the project the importance of highlighting great soul from ‘brown eyed’ folk, telling the stories as we do best.

The first EP in the supposed beginning trilogy is an eight track wonder made up of a few previous single releases as well as a couple new cuts with a select number of features added to the mix. Classic R&B signatures with a contemporary flavour seems to be theme concurrently running through Brown Eyed Soul Vol. 1.

So the EP starts strong with opener “Leave Me Be”. Delivering velvety smooth vocalsCherri V sings Cherri V fuses this with an instrumental dipped in a jazz influenced sound. The enchanting synths that lay low in the back add to the atmosphere and the rhythmic production give it an ultimately contemporary R&B feel. The intro, as it seems, is a song born from a personal place.

Da Beatfreaks-produced “Runaway” has a synonymous bounce that you associate with the production duo. In life and love, it’s human to be torn in, it’s human to be sometimes indecisive. And sometimes as humans we just want to get away from it all to find some sort clarity. This is Cherri’s anthem speaking her truth and I, for one, can definitely relate.

What is love without a little pain? Cheating has definitely gotten less sophisticated these days and the age of tech means the millennial struggle has another battlefield to try and manoeuvre. “Snapchat Mistress” is the age of story of infidelity but from a social media perspective. Emojis, explicit images and finding their location is only some of the topics on the agenda as Cherri presents relatable woes in crude from a male and female perspective over a trap-esque audio canvas.

And what could be worse than cheating? Feeling undervalued and worthless…while actually in a relationship. “Lockdown/Prisoner” is just that story. And with something as deep as this, you need the right production to match it. You definitely can’t have Soul without some soulful sounding keys, right? But throw in some of that extra urban UK production sensibilities and the result is another track that will have your head nodding.

Things You Do” possesses a carefree sensibility, allowing the joys of love and attraction to spark up the track while the light-hearted instrumentals are great fun and make you want to shuffle. The very infectious piano and drums-led offering, with its R&B/Pop sensibilities, showcases Cherri V’s amazing vocal talent, and her carefree and relatable song-writing.

Cherri-V-Leave-Me-BeI am personally a sucker for a piano ballad and “Situationship” definitely ticks all the boxes for me. A beautifully orchestrated piano melody at the core, poignant lyrics and the sweet vocals of Cherri and Sincerely Wilson. Quite the millennial phrase, they detail that inconvenient position of not being officially being someone’s significant other despite desperately desiring to be.

It was a nice touch calling on the vocals of R&B veteran Terri Walker for the penultimate offering “Brown Eyed Soul (Interlude)”. Think of it as a passing of the baton, from the scholar to the student. But more so than that, it’s a brief but special vocal masterclass from such a revered talent.

And then we are left to “Swimming”, our grand finale, which sees Cherri sticking to the overarching ‘classic yet contemporary’ feel pushing the envelope musically with this experimental R&B musical backdrop, backed by synth piano arrangements and underpinned by Cherri’s amazing vocal performance and delivery, with RoxXxan providing the perfect guest rap verse to complement the record. The strength of this record propels the project as a whole and is a strong way to end it all.

In eight short tracks (excluding Situationship) Brown Eyed Soul Vol. 1 manages to explore the breadths of R&B in its own sort of sophistication, not only in terms of sounds but also with content. Cherri’s pen explores love, lust and relationships in a relatable and palatable manner which is commendable. As if there are enough superlatives to describe the vocal display by Cherri V. This EP is well produced and above all there are no ‘fillers’ which is satisfying for personally. It is a great position to springboard off – no how many volumes of Brown Eyed Soul we will be ultimately treated to.

On The Come Up – SiR (aka inglewood SiR)

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Unfamiliar to some but rated by many, SiR is the perfect artist to add to the On The Come Up and it would be my pleasure to introduce you to him.

The west coast native, as the name suggests, has been making a quiet storm prior to and post signing to TDE and with collaborations with the likes of Little Simz, Big K.R.I.T. and Anderson. Paak, there is a certain level of credibility in his atmosphere. His brand of new school R&B comes matched with his sensual vocals, a whole lot of groove and sprinkles of Hip-Hop.

Sir Darryl Farris (that’s actually his real name) is an established Singer-songwriter. Before actually pursuing artistry, he was penning songs for the likes of Anita Baker, Ginuwine and Jill Scott.

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The son of a well seasoned backing vocalist, the nephew of Prince bassist Andrew Gouche and the brother of hit songwriters Daniel and Davion Farris. His childhood was a blur of church choir rehearsals and studio sessions. And that’s why he almost ended up not taking a hand to music at all. After a crazy ride in Hollywood, the prodigal son returned back.

Seeing the success of his brothers’ songwriting team, The WoodWorks, changed SiR’s perspective.

He landed a job engineering for Tyrese in 2012 while quietly developing his craft as a songwriter and putting out two mixtapes in the process; Wooden Voodoo and Long Live Dilla. But what caught everyone’s attention, including my own was his first full length album Seven Sundays.

Seven Sundays displays simple craftsmanship. What captivated me was in ways much similar to the likes of H.E.R., and the vast works of Musiq Soulchild, the artistry was at the centre. A unique contrast to the thuggish singing-trap rap hybrid that has engulfed a lot of contemporary R&B. It is one of the very few albums which I can sit and listen to it in its entirety . “In The Sky“, “Falling” “Jay Z” are some of the standouts.

It seems a rather timely affair that I write this with the release of his debut album a few short months ago under the TDE imprint November, which sadly did not come out in November. It plays to Farris’ strengths. It takes on his musical mainstays, a rich mix of Neo-Soul silkiness, Hip-Hop attitude and R&B songwriting, encapsulated in a thematic audible experience of dystopian space odyssey…about love. Something he, being married for years, would know quite a bit about.

As he longs for his mystery woman’s affections on “War”, dismisses her perceived clinginess on “Never Home” and wants her back on “Better”, SiR easily captures what it’s like being in an intense relationship. November sum up the emotional confusion that sometimes swallows up an intimate connection.

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Signing to one of the most well known rosters in music would, for some, be daunting. Kendrick Lamar, SZA, Ab-Soul, Schoolboy Q to name but a few. It’s a bit of a shame he wasn’t on the Black Panther soundtrack BUT that doesn’t rule out a collab with ‘Kung Fu Kenny’ or the likes sometime soon; especially knowing how excellent “Something Foreign” with Schoolboy Q was. Having cultivated his own fanbase prior, this is only the next step on the ladder for this super talented cat.

“I think the one thing that pushes me the hardest is that I know I have the opportunity to change lives…and really make a difference” – SiR.

Favourite Albums of 2017 part 1

This is nothing new here, and an evolution rather of something I did previously. This year, I’ve just been immersing myself in what I feel is quality music. Rather that just writing a review on every single project, why not see the year off in style and do a top album compilation. Divided into two parts, this is my “Favourite Albums of 2017”. Enjoy.

At What Cost – GoldLink

The DC rapper’s stock has been rising since he dropped The God Complex in 2014. A Complex feature, Rick Rubin collabs and a spot on the XXL Freshman Class in 2015 later and he finally dropped his debut album since his RCA record deal.
At What Cost is a salute to GoldLink’s hometown, the birthplace of go-go music, Washington D.C. There are groovy go-go feels running through majority of the tracks and generally in the theme of the album from the skits to the artwork which are married 1200x630bbwith his ‘future bounce’ vibe (Hip-Hop/House). He further salutes with having prominent D.C. legends Mýa and Wale as guest features. Couple trap-like songs towards the end of the album as granted with the times do make the album fizzle out so track listing could be better but it doesn’t take away majorly from the strength of this album. “Meditation” with Jazmine Sullivan has its groovy baseline and party-like beat and synths; “Roll Call”  with Mya is disco sweetly mixed with base guitars and violins. Definitely my favourite songs on the album along with “Summatime” with Wale. Seeing him perform live last month definitely brought the album to life and reaffirmed what I believed all along, he is undoubtedly a showman. “Crew” almost serves as the patriarch of the album. It has performed very well chart-wise and garnered GoldLink his first Grammy nomination so I wish him good luck on that front. If you need funk and groove in your life, I present to you the album to do that.

 

ALL-AMERIKKKAN BADA$$ – Joey Bada$$

Joey Bada$$ is another guy on the come-up. A young man who is navigating the Hip-Hop journey in some style. He has grafted considerably to the place that he stands at now and all his experiences have birthed an album that far exceeded my expectations. Suggestive from the name, an overt reference to Ice Cube’s first solo album AmeriKKKa’s Most Alll Amerikkkan Badass.pngWanted, his latest project ALL-AMERIKKKAN BADA$$ is a very politically fuelled body of work, addressing issues like social mobility, racial tensions and the whole political sphere in general through Joey’s storytelling rhymes. It is an album that encapsulates the ideas and feelings of being a young black man in America and I feel like he captured that especially sublimely with the visuals for “TEMPTATION” and “LAND OF THE FREE” Sonically, it leans towards Hip-Hop in a classic sort of way; “RING THE ALARM has a sort of dark feel to it, with raw, gritty rap style synonymous with the likes of Wu-Tang Clan or Ruff Ryders. He also does so on my favourite of the album “LEGENDARY” featuring Rap phenom J. Cole. The re-work of Andile Yenana’s “Thembisa (The People)” had me from the drop. Shout out the GOAT Statik Selektah. Not only does Joey tell his narrative but also the narrative of others and that’s why the album is so powerful. There is a clear vision and message being sent here. An expert job in bringing a new lease of life into ‘Conscious Rap’.

 

Everybody – Logic

Who knew an album so simply titled could be so complex. On one front, a lot of it did come across as apologetic. He’s ‘sad and sorry’ to ‘be white’ and is resentful of his MIXED heritage, especially when taking into consideration the current state of racial politics in America.  One may feel like he over-compensates with his approach to Black empowerment at times even though his intentions are pure with it.1a2c364a06d2844fd9e294ee0ea798ff.1000x1000x1
But in spite of all that, it a nod to the Human Condition, which runs parallel with the most intimate parts of his biography. It is an album of consciousness and edification.  There are some real gems on this album like the beautifully orchestrated, Grammy nominated “1-800-273-8255” featuring Alessia Cara and Khalid which touches on the sensitive matter of suicide, “Killing Spree” featuring Ansel Elgort which touches on the negative aspects of social media & new age technology, and the soul-uplifting & quirky “Black SpiderMan” with Damian Lemar Hudson which is a celebration of diversity and acceptance. The skits/storyline running through the album weaves in with the overarching theme and all ties together by the end of the final track; reminding the listeners to live, love and enjoy, because no matter who you are – everybody is born equal – eloquently put across by the incomparable Neil Degrasse Tyson and symbolised once again by the title to the album, Everybody.

 

Common Sense – J Hus

J Hus Is The Sound Of Diaspora’s Boomerang.

His debut serves as a unique coming-of-age story, one that should resonate with young people domestically and beyond. The nuances in this project, whether small or large, play key parts. The title track “Common Sense” doubles as the intro track. The way the song fades in like a crescendo is such a brilliant way to start the album. The live J_HUS_COMMON_SENSE_HUE_1_1__ja9y9i.pnginstrumentation also adds to making this a powerful into – The Compozers are to thank for that. The drums, the keys, the bass, the keytar, the trumpet… with every instrument you can feel the passion oozing through.
He pays his homage in this album as he blends the different sounds of his vibrant London hometown and upbringing – UK Rap, Afro-Bashment, Garage etc. There may not be skits or a inherent and obvious storyline running through the album but the theme of the project is still obvious to me. J Hus is back and this is his ego-filled statement of intent to let you know and feel that he is THE MAN. Lyrics matched with bold production; understand his level of bravado. The elastic bounce of “Bouff Daddy”, the grime menacing “Clartin” or maybe you’d prefer the reflective yet unmatched party vibe “Spirit“.
Take your pick, J Hus makes GOOD music. With him and his trusted producer and brother JAE5, there is a bond that is deeper than rap. The understanding they have is real and has cultivated one of the best urban offerings of the year. It’s not by chance. If a Mercury Prize nomination doesn’t turn your head and make you pay attention then I honestly don’t know what will.

 

The Other Side – The Walls Group

I am a stickler for good singing (which you’d be surprised doesn’t exist too much these days and The Walls Group truly personify that to the nth degree.
The greatest thing take away from the Gospel quartet’s junior album is that it is mature yet youthful. While that seems to be a juxtaposition, the essence is that this latest project is a much more mature take from their 2014 effort Fast Forward where they were younger, less experimental and took heed more to the wisdom and musical direction of mentor Kirk Franklin yet still has their signature ‘Walls Sauce‘. They have come a long way since then and the album is a now reflection of who they are as artists and as lovers of music.The-Walls-Group-The-Other-Side-album-cover_sized-1024x1024
What I love about this album is that it has genuinely has something for everyone. It navigates through classic and modern without it feeling like a ‘mash up’. It goes from Country, Pop Rock to Contemporary Worship and others but as varied as it is, they make it work. My favourites are the New Jack Swing anthem “Don’t Cha Know” and R&B/Rap vibe “Mercy” which I had on repeat for the longest time. Plus their upbeat leading single “My Life” has been a staple in my Gym Playlist and carries the age old message that people seem to forget – just let me be me, let me be great. Thanks be primarily to Eric Dawkins and Warryn Campbell who were key to the project. It is a tight body of work that allows the group to fully flex their God given vocal talent while be unique, faith-filled and expressive.

 

Part 2 to follow….

Women of Soul – My Black British Top 5

It’s Black History Month, so why not (shrugs).

I’ve never had that typical musical upbringing. You know, the usual narratives like…

“My Dad had – insert classic artist names here – in his vinyl/CD collection”

or the infamous “My mum always played – insert popular artist name here – in the front room when we had to clean the house”

Yeah, none of that. My mum didn’t often play music at home and if she did, it was her Worship music compilations. Still, that didn’t stop my young, inquisitive self putting my ears in places it shouldn’t have been; It opened me up to the big, beautiful musical world. I developed a real appreciation for R&B and Soul but I feel sometimes the British trailblazers don’t get enough credit. I’ll do my bit. Here’s my top 5, in no particular order of course.

1. Sade Adu

If you’ve been reading my stuff for a while, you might have noticed this is not the first time I’ve mentioned her name and probably won’t be the last. Sade-Adu7-600x488I don’t know what age I was when I first heard “Smooth Operator” but that song has stuck with me for the longest. There’s no-one I know that sounds quite like Sade. She just has a way with words and her vocals & tone are so full of character that they could tell a story when words may fail.  I personally don’t think there are many famed singers  who wouldn’t cite her as a source of influence and inspiration. She has developed a strong global fan base (she’s a lot bigger in the US than the UK) which is evident from her ability to tour and make a #1 hit record despite going on more than one hiatus, in an industry where it is not difficult to become yesterday’s news today. While these days she has become more reclusive, she is most certainly not irrelevant.

2) Beverley Knight

‘The Queen of the Black Country’ or ‘The Queen of British Soul’ or whatever you may wish to call her, Ms. Beverley Knight is a household name and has been a staple in the British Music industry for a few decades now.153265 It’s crazy because just the other day I stumbled across “Keep This Fire Burning”, a song which I haven’t heard since Primary school (a banger might I add) and I could almost sing the whole chorus AND the video gave me crazy nostalgia feels. While her traditional Gospel and Soul background is greatly evident in the way she performs, especially live,  the beauty of her artistry is how natural her catalogue of hits navigated through different genres… and how simple she could make it all look. Beverley Knight encapsulated an era of music in Britain where R&B, which was essentially Pop back in the day, was really in heavy rotation. She was a name that you were bound to hear on the radio and see on TV.

3) Estelle

I’m not biased because we’re birthday twins. For me, Estelle was one of the first artists of my generation that I recognised really making major moves. I became a fan from when she dropped “1980” (which happens to now be one of my favourite Estelle songs) and Estelleshe was on my radar ever since. She has definitely come a long way from her humble beginnings and in every interview or public appearance, she definitely flies the flag and is proud of whom she is and where she’s from. If there is one thing I have always appreciated it is her versatility; the soul in her, the R&B, the Pop and Hip-Hop can all shine on a particular album as a reflection of her own influences. Despite her last album dropping in 2015, she’s been generally flying under the radar as of late with the exception of features here and there for De La Soul and Tyler, The Creator but it’s high time that we got a brand new Estelle album.
She dropped a new single “Love Like Ours” – go pree that.

4) Marsha Ambrosius

Marsha Ambrosius needs not an introduction but ‘The Songstress’ is renowned for being one half of the legendary R&B duo Floetry. Fans of R&B/Soul music the world over know of the Grammy nominated pair for songs like “Say Yes”, “Getting Late” and “SupaStar”. marsha-kimWhile I feel their active years were quite short lived, Marsha never stopped contributing to the world of music and staying true to her genre and art form. She is appreciated for the bold and effortless way she works her unique tone and it has gotten her the chance to work with just about everyone BIG in the game – from Nas to Queen Latifah, From Dr. Dre to Robert Glasper, from Kanye to Jamie Foxx. Not only does her talent lie in her vocals but also in her pen, writing one of my favourite MJ songs (originally recorded by Floetry) “Butterflies”. She often isn’t the first name the comes to mind and like Sade isn’t as embraced in her homeland but her contributions definitely paved the way.

5) Lianne La Havas

While it’s not the typical soul … I have really developed a special and deep rooted affinity to Lianne La Havas and the wonderful way she has concocted her brand of Soul b8d40aca0412d6bf75fa703482f7f3abe6df5f5cwith elements of Folk and R&B. Arguably, one of Britain’s best soulful exports in recent years excluding the giants like Adele, her Grammy, Mercury, MOBO, Brit and Ivor Novello award nominations are testament to her craft. I believe it is the power of her style of music and her sophisticated writing ability that has allowed her and also her beloved guitar to take to festivals and stages all over the world. A genuine fan of her 2015 album Blood, she is not an artist you should pass up on by any means. If you don’t at least have “Lost and Found” in your Spotify or Apple Music playlist somewhere then I really question what you are doing.

 

While there can only be a top 5, honourable mentions must go to Corrine Bailey Rae, Melissa Bell & Caron Wheeler, Emeli Sande, Shola Ama, Cynthia Erivo and Gabrielle. These ladies plus the 5 aforementioned have really helped make British Soul/R&B what it is today and I would hope their names can live forever more.

On The Come Up – Anik Khan

The start of a new segment. Highlighting the up and coming that are about to do major things in the industry. Keep your ear to the ground. These guys are bubbling up in a major way

Kicking things off, we got Anik Khan. A rapper and singer/ songwriter, he is the son of Bangladeshi migrants but was raised in the home of Music, New York. He takes inspiration from his Queens home town which he hails all the time. His main drive for music comes from his father, a poet and prolific speaker in his time but found himself hustling in New York as a cab driver upon moving to The States.

His culture was never lost on him –   coming home to an immigrant family made him real Anik Khan micappreciative of his Bengali side, but being on the block surrounded by the sounds of Jay Z, Eminem, Nas, and Biggie gave him almost a dual upbringing.

While I find Anik’s smooth, silky vocals go along way with his penchant for harmonies, what is more captivating is how he manages to blend his influences together; his New York, urban vibe and his Bengali folk heritage. His joint ‘Cleopatra’ for example. The Bengali folk vibe preludes to a hip-hop-like syth-bass and the same sort of fusion is present in the chorus. As opposite as such styles can be, they work.

One of my personal favourites has to be ‘Too Late Now‘. With almost 1 million streams on Spotify, it is probably one of his most famous and it is a incredible mix of jazz, dance/electronic vibes, vocals and rap finesse. Definitely a crowd pleaser. Word to Jarreau Vandal on the production.

 

His EP ‘I Don’t Know Yet’ is a journey both the listener and artist take as Anik paves his way to find himself and develop equilibrium in two worlds, to achieve harmony betweenAnik Khan Flag his American and Bengali personas. Anik speaks for those like him who left their homeland to grind for that ‘American Dream’.

While his EP is very lyrical and flow, his 2017 debut album ‘Kites’ takes a more vocal direction which came as a surprise for me. Not that it was a bad body of work but I hoped for a mix of styles to really show off the artist that he is; more commercial I would argue. The full extent of his talent and artistry is his USP and he should hold on to it.

“When you hear an Anik Khan song, there’s always gonna be some flavour. You’ll get the salt and pepper but there’s also Cumin and Turmeric in there…every time”

 

A night with Christon Gray and J Givens – Concert review

I had the pleasure of being in attendance and witnessing one of my favourite artists Christon Gray take to the London stage for the first time and, along with J Givens, he gave the audience at St Mary’s Church a night to remember. After seeing the flyer for this early in December, there was almost no way at all I was going to miss this. I took the trip down to West London, awaiting the legends that were. Now let me tell you all about it.

Jay Ess was first up, with a new and improved vibe, accompanied with his fresh choir.

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 JayEss and his band

He gave us some new material from his up-coming project and along with the major throwback ‘Intoxicated’, he reminded us why he was once considered one of UK Gospel’s golden boys. Kat Deal was up next. A relatively new face to the scene, known by very few. The crowd warmed to her with her Alternative Pop look and Jazz vocal stylings. Singing original songs and a soulful cover of Kirk Franklin’s “Smile”, she definitely made some new fans by the end of her set.

Now to the main event. J Givens took to the stage and the crowd flocked to the stage.

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J Givens in his element

If there is anything I have admired about him it is his lyricism, quick flow and to match that with his active performance style, it made for a feast for the senses. He engaged with the crowd while taking us on a journey through his album “Fly Exam”, the hype tracks and the mellow joints. The essence of Hip-Hop is alive and well. You felt a part of the family as he shared his testimony about his drug addiction and by the end, the crowd were shouting Hallelujah in agreement. For the die-hard fans reciting the bars alongside, he did not fail to deliver.

The man of the hour, Christon Gray came and fans flocked even more quicker than before. Gray started off his set with some of his older material. The whole crowd singing along to “The Last Time” set the tone for what was an amazing night. He is definitely a showman, displaying his full versatility as an artist flowing from R&B to Soul to Gospel to Rap. Contrasting moments of electricity with him rapping, bringing out J Givens to do “Stop Me Remix” leaving you unable to formulate words because you’re so excited THEN moments of hush and awe with his slow ballads accompanied with his keyboard; literally him playing the keys and singing “Black Male” you are literally without words. It felt as if I was going down memory lane as he performed songs from his whole catalogue. Trust me I was singing at the top of my lungs when I heard “Long Way Down” and “Isle of You”. Crowd engagement didn’t go amiss as he spontaneously put together an ‘airband’ to help him perform the funk groove that is “SuperDave”. Then he brings half the crowd on stage during ‘Open Door’ AND THEN jumps into the crowd. Totally unexpected.

The night was filled with love, laughs and pure vibes. Both Gray and Givens were both incredibly down to earth and both artists’ presence complimented the night perfectly. Shout out to Zion Promotions for bringing down one of the 4 artists I HAD to see before I died; and they were gracious enough to chat to the ‘FANmily’ afterwards. All I ask is for more dope shows like this in the future.

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#ShakkaTakesKOKO – A night for British music

Thursday 15th September was the date and KOKO was the place to be as the talented Shakka graced the stage and gave a headline show worth remembering. The MOBO award winner held nothing back giving fans – The Tribe – new music, surprises upon surprises and above all else an experience. I myself was in attendance with my own ‘tribe’ and our 13 strong group positioned ourselves right at the front so we could fully enjoy the show; and cli4whivaaeyhxhenjoy we most definitely did.

Shout outs are in order. First, to the DJ for the night Chuckie Online who kept the crowd alive inside while the countdown was on till the main event. Great mix of old school (some songs I hadn’t heard in a long time) and the new school had us vibing so you couldn’t help dance. Even treated to a cheeky dance cameo from the House of Alt guys. You guys rock!

Jay Prince was the sole opening act of the night. An upcoming London rapper is versatile, multi-talented and a producer in his own right. His brand of chilled Hip-Hop is 90’s style beats is matched with his modern flow. Reminds me of Hawk House or Little Simz. I’ll definitely check out his music.

On to the main event. The moment he opened with the intro to the Lost Boys, the crowd were all singing in unison but the moment he touched the stage, the Tribe ERUPTED. The energy was there from the get go and all the songs were just taken to a whole new level thanks to the band. Did I mention, there was a full live band. Yeah, he did that.
Shakka took us on a musical journey. His impressive catalogue is full of hits and so the nostalgia was in full force. We went back to Shakka Crown Affair and when he dropped Take Our Time, that was special. That was the first Shakka song I ever heard and had me hooked ever since. The Shakkapella POPPED OFF too. He sang the Somebody I Used To Know / Climax mash up and First surprise of the night was bringing out Vula Malinga – who sang it with him – and boy did it get hot. Her vocals and runs were giving us all life.

Keeping with the creative vibe, his second surprise was a very intimate cover of Coldplay’s Magic which then flowed into Controlla, which then flowed into Ojuelegba. It was just so cool how he brought the songs to life and make it work with an acoustic touch.
And in light of the recent police injustice, the sentiment in singing A Change Is Gonna Come by Sam Cooke did not go unnoticed. Heart-warming to say the least.

For the record, Just Want To See You is my favourite Shakka song. I would have fainted when it came on but I had to keep composure. Shout out to Mafro who killed the guitar solo and pretty much the entire show. Now it wouldn’t be a Shakka show without his biggest hits and if bringing out Frisco for Walking With Elephants wasn’t enough, he brought out JME to shut down Say Nada. Third surprise. I think at that point my eardrums were close to bursting and I stepped on 3 people in the moshpit. It was that intense.

 

At the end of it all, Junior the Drummer took his shirt off, I lost my voice, there’s a lot of new music to look forward to and Shakka is one of the best to do what he does.  I won’t lie, if you weren’t there you truly missed out. Nonetheless, onwards and upwards for Mr. 2K’s in 2017.

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