The Coldest Winter Ever by Ms Banks – Strength in Versatility

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Women in Hip-Hop has always been seen to be such a taboo topic and one has never really understood why, it’s not as if they don’t exist. Not only has rap been made to be a competitive sport but also a male sport. Within the UK sphere, the more successful female artists create songs that at most merely graze the ‘urban’ surface.

But now we’re experiencing a resurgence and one of the front runners leading the movement is none other than Ms Banks. From humble beginnings and near obscurity, Ms Banks has propelled herself into the Rap spotlight. Not keeping us waiting for too long, she finally releases a full length project to sink our teeth into The Coldest Winter Ever.

Taking the name from the famous 1999 novel by the American rapper and author Sister Souljah, both projects share similarities. Like the book, Banks’ latest release centres on the trials and tribulations of the female protagonist. A nuanced body of work, it’s a story of love, friendships, career highs and lows and ultimately making it on top.

So it all kicks off with the “Intro” which is more like a riveting monologue backed to the sounds of hushed lullaby pianos and orchestral violins. In true poetic fashion, she gives us a foretaste of what is to come.

Judging from the singles that came before it, The Coldest Winter Ever was always going to be about showing off her versatility. We start proceedings by having two of the finest 5691ab6db1fc657a3592dffee21a6c9fupcoming artists from South London join forces for a heater. Ms Banks enlists the help of Drill ‘Cool Kid’ Loski from the Harlem Spartans for “R.I.P“, stepping into his world as she embodies the drill sound. As Loski comes through, both artists lay down their bars as they address all of the talk from the haters. She definitely doesn’t disappoint on the Drill vibe, as she also goes straight dark hood mode with the slow creeper that is third track “Bangs”.

One of my standouts has to be “Over (Your Shit)” for the very fact that it’s a side of Ms Banks we’re generally less accustomed to. It’s a smooth R&B cut which sees her trade bars and flow for vocals and intonation and changes the vibe completely. Ms Banks evokes a softer side as she looks back over a past relationship and professes it all as a form of release to get over the heartbreak.

We know she can be tough and gritty, we see that she can be soft and vulnerable. But with the Toddla T-produced riddim “Chat 2 Mi Gyal”, Ms Banks gets the space to be incredibly playful and free with her bars, upon bars. Another one of my standouts, it has the bounce of dancehall but the freestyle nature of real Hip-Hop with such an infectious rhythm that you just can’t help but bounce with.

The mixtape doesn’t harbour many features, which gives a listening experience that is quintessentially Ms Banks. For the most part, the lack of features doesn’t fare a big issue as she provides enough style diversity to suffice. Besides Loski, there are some other notable mentions.

Mulla” is about ‘exactly what it says on the tin’ in layman’s terms and is a hustler’s anthem for all the go-getters listening. Somewhere between singing and rapping Ms Banks finds the pockets within the Trap-esque beat where she seamlessly rides and she is contrasted by the raw grit of UK’s under-the-radar rappers Dutch. Two different vibes but the context is still the same captured sweetly by the catchy chorus.

Made It” is another retrospective cut featuring singer Montana who plays a bit part role on the hook and it’s straight up alternative R&B. While she reflects on the anguish that a past relationship caused from feeling undervalued, she shares her story in poetic form not for you to show sympathy but empathy as she lets go and overcomes.

msbanksfeaturedThe mixtape wouldn’t be complete without two of her biggest singles to date. “Come Thru” is simply another banger that should be on your UK Rap list, male or female. It holds a hard Hip-Hop sound encapsulated by the heavy bassline as oozes Black Girl Magic in such a boastful way. Now if you compare that with the upbeat urban pop sounds of “Day Ones” where she dedicates the track to the ones who have been supporting her from early yet she still manages to keep her authentic street self; it just goes to show that Ms Banks has a lot in her repertoire.

Ms Banks signs out paying homage with “Pen Game 2”.  After the viral success of Margs’ #PenGameChallenge on Twitter, it only made sense to have him feature on the track. It’s bold, boastful from the pair as they freestyle over one of the most hype beats you’ll hear in a while. It’s a real South London to East London connection.

As stated much earlier, The Coldest Winter Ever is a clear demonstration of the scope of artist that Ms Banks. While there were no major pleasant surprises to shout about, she did what many know and expect from her, just better. Her mixtape summarises the period of life she is in now; A young woman who acknowledges and appreciates the lessons of her past but is over it all and is ready to take off career-wise. Her proven ability to make a plethora of radio-ready cuts is just the first step on the road to being considered one of the best that the UK has.

Geography by Tom Misch – A whole lotta Soul

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What were you doing at 21? While some are graduating from university or starting their own career, seasoned producer, singer/songwriter and DJ Tom Misch was gearing up to release his debut studio album. A seasoned multi-instrumentalist, it took only one year at a conservatoire of music to realise that bedroom producing would be the avenue he would take in order to achieve his dreams. Now, after working with some amazing talent in front and behind the scenes, we have the culmination of efforts of his several self-released mixtapes and EPs – Geography.

Geography is an album that takes on many of Misch’s different influences. Main elements of Funk and Jazz are staple to his brand but also Soul and Disco in smaller parts cover the breadth of this album. Fans of his, especially long term, will appreciate even the most Tom Mischminute of details.

The intro “Before Paris” is a spoken-word like opener, with an unnamed man speaking on the importance of the art form – a relevant sentiment for an artist like Tom – and serves as of a prelude to set the tone for what essentially is the first track, “Lost in Paris” with a slick contribution from talented Grammy nominated US rapper GoldLink.

Bringing a clever fusion of two differing musical instincts and results in something pretty tasteful. It’s bright and upbeat, driven by eccentric electric guitar chords and groove bass finished with a jazzy brass section that is too die for. For a song that was inspired by losing a hard drive full of music, its surprisingly cheerful.

South of the River” ‘brings out the boogie’ with a real disco feel, packed with deep lying basslines and accentuated with violins that serve as the icing on the cake – something that in theory shouldn’t work but in reality it does. While there’s nothing disco about South London, Misch does a great job of saluting his hometown.

For how upbeat the album is from the offset and seems to be holistically, it isn’t without it’s slower jams. Take “Movie” for example. It’s eased into from the previous track with a little love story monologue and it then captivates with those trademark guitar inflections set against the soulful vocals from Misch. It also happens to be a family affair with Tom’s own sister, Polly Misch, adding to the blissful atmosphere it creates. Of all the downtempo tracks, probably one of the most powerful.

Another slow song that is worth notable mention is “You’re On My Mind” which for me evokes a warm fuzzy feeling in my core. Acoustic guitars are the perfect accompaniment for Misch’s take on a sweet serenade this time and gives off the perfect summer evenings kind of vibe.

As talented as Tom is and as eccentric the sounds laden on the album may be, it is the features on Geography that really elevate it and make it worth the listen. One being an unlikely pairing of Tom and legendary US Hip-Hop super group De La Soul on “It Runs Through Me”.

A heavily jazz inspired cut, driven by the electric and bass guitars and topped off with bright piano chords. Simple yet soulful and uplifting, the mood transports you to the late night jazz lounges. Props also to De La Soul who definitely make the song extra special, riding the beat bar for bar, making for a poised rap verse.TomMisch2

A couple tracks later, we are treated to hip-thruster that is “Disco Yes” with Poppy Ajuda. It’s undeniable by now that Tom loves his guitars & basslines. With some funky riffs and increased tempo from the previous tracks added to the mix, Poppy Ajudha’s guest vocals merged with Tom’s, it makes for one of the most impressive on the entire record.

For what it’s worth, “Water Baby” I believe is the best track on the album. Tom Misch enlists his fellow South Londoner Loyle Carner in this melting pot of groovy jazz, soul and hip-hop mixture. It’s signature Tom Misch’s style, blending hip-hop beats and soulful melodies, producing an eargasm that finds its place somewhere between passionate head-nodding and casual, easy listening.

Cos I Love You” serves as the penultimate track and rounds off the Disco bug that Tom evidently caught when making this album as he merges old styles with the new. It’s a mashup, of sorts, with samples and a borrowed chorus tightly wound together to form the most beautifully orchestrated dancing track I’ve heard in a while.

For an album that expertly executes a plethora of different vibes, it does suffer from what I deem as occasional ‘fillers’. While I can acknowledge that “Isn’t She Lovely” – Misch’s take on the Stevie Wonder classic – & “Tick Tock” serve more in the capacity of interlude, they don’t really add much to the flavour and texture of the album.

Having said that,” We’ve Come So Far” is a reasonable way to conclude proceedings as the experimental sounds of Tom’s repertoire progressively build on the track, each layer contributing to the eventual crescendo before fizzling out.
Despite critique, fans can be happy that we now have a full length project from the young singer/beat-maker that they can really stick their teeth into. It covers multiple bases; spanning different vibes and genres means there is something in there for most people. While there isn’t a flowing storyline or explicit theme per say, this can double up also as a portfolio, showing off Tom’s capabilities and emphasising his credibility as a top producer. He can only go from strength to strength from here.