On The Come Up – SiR (aka inglewood SiR)

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Unfamiliar to some but rated by many, SiR is the perfect artist to add to the On The Come Up and it would be my pleasure to introduce you to him.

The west coast native, as the name suggests, has been making a quiet storm prior to and post signing to TDE and with collaborations with the likes of Little Simz, Big K.R.I.T. and Anderson. Paak, there is a certain level of credibility in his atmosphere. His brand of new school R&B comes matched with his sensual vocals, a whole lot of groove and sprinkles of Hip-Hop.

Sir Darryl Farris (that’s actually his real name) is an established Singer-songwriter. Before actually pursuing artistry, he was penning songs for the likes of Anita Baker, Ginuwine and Jill Scott.

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The son of a well seasoned backing vocalist, the nephew of Prince bassist Andrew Gouche and the brother of hit songwriters Daniel and Davion Farris. His childhood was a blur of church choir rehearsals and studio sessions. And that’s why he almost ended up not taking a hand to music at all. After a crazy ride in Hollywood, the prodigal son returned back.

Seeing the success of his brothers’ songwriting team, The WoodWorks, changed SiR’s perspective.

He landed a job engineering for Tyrese in 2012 while quietly developing his craft as a songwriter and putting out two mixtapes in the process; Wooden Voodoo and Long Live Dilla. But what caught everyone’s attention, including my own was his first full length album Seven Sundays.

Seven Sundays displays simple craftsmanship. What captivated me was in ways much similar to the likes of H.E.R., and the vast works of Musiq Soulchild, the artistry was at the centre. A unique contrast to the thuggish singing-trap rap hybrid that has engulfed a lot of contemporary R&B. It is one of the very few albums which I can sit and listen to it in its entirety . “In The Sky“, “Falling” “Jay Z” are some of the standouts.

It seems a rather timely affair that I write this with the release of his debut album a few short months ago under the TDE imprint November, which sadly did not come out in November. It plays to Farris’ strengths. It takes on his musical mainstays, a rich mix of Neo-Soul silkiness, Hip-Hop attitude and R&B songwriting, encapsulated in a thematic audible experience of dystopian space odyssey…about love. Something he, being married for years, would know quite a bit about.

As he longs for his mystery woman’s affections on “War”, dismisses her perceived clinginess on “Never Home” and wants her back on “Better”, SiR easily captures what it’s like being in an intense relationship. November sum up the emotional confusion that sometimes swallows up an intimate connection.

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Signing to one of the most well known rosters in music would, for some, be daunting. Kendrick Lamar, SZA, Ab-Soul, Schoolboy Q to name but a few. It’s a bit of a shame he wasn’t on the Black Panther soundtrack BUT that doesn’t rule out a collab with ‘Kung Fu Kenny’ or the likes sometime soon; especially knowing how excellent “Something Foreign” with Schoolboy Q was. Having cultivated his own fanbase prior, this is only the next step on the ladder for this super talented cat.

“I think the one thing that pushes me the hardest is that I know I have the opportunity to change lives…and really make a difference” – SiR.

On The Come Up – Noname

Next up, we have Noname. Anyone who is familiar with that Alternative R&B/Hip-Hop realm might be familiar with the name Noname (brilliant pun, see what I did there?). As well as having features on a few songs with Chance The Rapper she’s befriended and worked with new school names like Mick Jenkins, Xavier Omar and Smino.

Here you have quirky, young black Chicago native doing what one would say is the equivalent to Slam Poetry…and it is dope! Excuse my colloquial English. While her artistry roots are found in poetry circles, Ms. Fatimah Warner has always had a love for music as wide reaching as it comes. She cites her inspirations being blues musicians Buddy Guy and Howlin’ Wolf from an early age as well as Tina Turner, Jay Electronica and Tony Morrison. Her love for music, passion for poetry and being around other Chicago creatives helped evolve a pursuit into rap.

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After the delays and a shift in musical  direction, she released her debut project ‘Telefone’ to become one of the most critcally acclaimed albums of 2016; one of the reasons being that it bent the rules of what we define as Hip-Hop. Sure you have gender benders all around but Noname is different and Telefone was a breath of fresh air. Centered around important telephone conversations that Noname has had over the years, Telefone speaks of black women’s strife and also highlights the struggles of growing up in her Chicago hometown with a unique blend of melodies, rap/poetry and out-of-the-box production. Definitely long awaited as well, three years in the making. But being able to endure life experiences and put it into your music makes for true art. For her , it was the introduction officially and finally to who Noname is as an artist.

Despite controversially not appearing on the XXL Freshmen Class of 2017,

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she still has managed to develop a name for herself and her mixtape featured on The Skinny’s ‘Top 50 Albums of 2016’ and Noisey’s ‘The 100 Best Albums of 2016’ as well as a coveted appearance on NPR Music’s notable ‘Tiny Desk Series’. Now fans in America and beyond sit and wait for her next project to drop ‘Room 25’. The hope is that she doesn’t delay for three years AGAIN but releases in timely fashion and carries on the momentum that she has. Will she remain an independent is not known but the path she treads is most definitely working for her.

 

“I don’t typically think about myself when I’m thinking about making music like [I’m a female rapper and this is my role in Hip-Hop], I’m more so just making art…”

On The Come Up – Anik Khan

The start of a new segment. Highlighting the up and coming that are about to do major things in the industry. Keep your ear to the ground. These guys are bubbling up in a major way

Kicking things off, we got Anik Khan. A rapper and singer/ songwriter, he is the son of Bangladeshi migrants but was raised in the home of Music, New York. He takes inspiration from his Queens home town which he hails all the time. His main drive for music comes from his father, a poet and prolific speaker in his time but found himself hustling in New York as a cab driver upon moving to The States.

His culture was never lost on him –   coming home to an immigrant family made him real Anik Khan micappreciative of his Bengali side, but being on the block surrounded by the sounds of Jay Z, Eminem, Nas, and Biggie gave him almost a dual upbringing.

While I find Anik’s smooth, silky vocals go along way with his penchant for harmonies, what is more captivating is how he manages to blend his influences together; his New York, urban vibe and his Bengali folk heritage. His joint ‘Cleopatra’ for example. The Bengali folk vibe preludes to a hip-hop-like syth-bass and the same sort of fusion is present in the chorus. As opposite as such styles can be, they work.

One of my personal favourites has to be ‘Too Late Now‘. With almost 1 million streams on Spotify, it is probably one of his most famous and it is a incredible mix of jazz, dance/electronic vibes, vocals and rap finesse. Definitely a crowd pleaser. Word to Jarreau Vandal on the production.

 

His EP ‘I Don’t Know Yet’ is a journey both the listener and artist take as Anik paves his way to find himself and develop equilibrium in two worlds, to achieve harmony betweenAnik Khan Flag his American and Bengali personas. Anik speaks for those like him who left their homeland to grind for that ‘American Dream’.

While his EP is very lyrical and flow, his 2017 debut album ‘Kites’ takes a more vocal direction which came as a surprise for me. Not that it was a bad body of work but I hoped for a mix of styles to really show off the artist that he is; more commercial I would argue. The full extent of his talent and artistry is his USP and he should hold on to it.

“When you hear an Anik Khan song, there’s always gonna be some flavour. You’ll get the salt and pepper but there’s also Cumin and Turmeric in there…every time”